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Neutron

Neutron®

Breakthrough technology that reduces reflux to help maintain catheter patency while providing a safe and effective microbial barrier.

Infusion Therapy Products

Clinical Evidence

The in vivo evaluation of the flushing efficiency of different designs of clear needle-free connectors (94 KB)

Breznock EM, Sylvia CJ Jr. BioSurg, Inc., 2011

A needleless closed system device (Clave®) protects from intravascular catheter tip and hub colonization: a prospective randomized study (74 KB)

Bouza E, Munoz P, Lopez-Rodriguez J, Jesus Perez M, Rincon C, et al. J Hosp Infect. 2003; 54:279–287

Increased Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates After the Introduction of a New Mechanical Valve Intravenous Access Port (73 KB)

Maragakis L., Bradley K., et al. Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 2006, vol. 27, no. 1; 67-70

Differences in bacterial transfer and fluid path colonization through needlefree connector-catheter systems in vitro (90 KB)

Ryder M, James G, Pulchini E, Bickle L, Parker A. Presented at the Infusion Nursing Society Meeting, May 2011

Comparison of Bacterial Transfer and Biofilm Formation on Intraluminal Catheter Surfaces Among Eight Connectors in a Clinically Simulated in vitro Model (107 KB)

Ryder M, Pulcini E, Parker A, James G. Presented at the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week, February 2013

Clinical Effect of the Neutron™ Needlefree Catheter Patency Device in Reducing PICC Line Occlusions and Cath-Flo™ Usage in a Teaching Hospital (107 KB)

Star Watts BSN RN CRNI VA-BC, IV Team Nurse Manager, Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Utilizing the Neutron™ Catheter Patency Device to Reduce the Clinical Costs Associated with Central Line Catheter Occlusion (423 KB)

A pilot study evaluation of three needlefree IV connectors and their ability to maintain catheter patency over a 11-day period (143 KB)

The in vivo evaluation of the flushing efficiency of the Neutron™ needlefree catheter patency device compared to two other connectors commonly used on central and PICC lines (150 KB)

Breznock E, Sylvia C. 2011

Evaluation of the Neutron™ needlefree catheter patency device technology and resistance to microbial ingress (125 KB)

AAIPharma Services

Observational in-vivo evaluation of the Neutron™ needlefree catheter patency device and its effects on catheter occlusions in a home care setting (93 KB)

Developing a Closed, Intravenous Medication System for a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (131 KB)

Tanner J, Neonatal Intensive Care Journal, July-August 2012

The Clave® connector: meeting functional specifications when exposed to high-risk infusates over a 72-hour period (71 KB)

Antimicrobial efficacy of the Clave® Connector using silver-saturated fluid path elements (290 KB)

Evaluation of the Clave Technology and Resistance to Microbial Ingress (100 KB)

2008

Antimicrobial efficacy of the MicroClave Connector using silver-saturated fluid path elements (390 KB)

2008

Bacterial transfer through needlefree connectors: comparison of nine different devices (77 KB)

Ryder M, Fisher S, Hamilton G, Hamilton M, James G. Presented at the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Annual Scientific Meeting, April 2007

The Potential for Catheter Microbial Contamination from a Needleless Connector (71 KB)

Brown J.D., et al. Journal of Hospital Infection 1997; 36:181-189

Extended use microbial challenge and disinfection study of the Clave® connector (67 KB)

An independent study conducted by Laboratory Services, Inc., Monrovia, CA

Experimental microbial challenge and decontamination of Clave® connectors (71 KB)

Paul A. Gibilisco, MD, FAACP, FACR, Gregory S. Page

Evaluation of the Clave® technology and resistance to microbial ingress (69 KB)

Report of a study commissioned by ICU and conducted by Nelson Laboratories

Significantly decreased rate of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) after discontinuation of a luer access device (LAD) at an academic medical center (72 KB)

C. Moore, R. Landreth, C. Maschmeier, K. Snyder, G. Priestly, S. Elliott. From posters presented at the 2009 SHEA and 2010 APIC Annual Meetings and Facing the Challenge of CR-BSIs. Managing Infection Control; November, 2009

Efficacy of three different valve systems of needlefree closed connectors in avoiding access of microorganisms to endovascular catheters after incorrect handling (73 KB)

J. Yébenes, M. Delgado, G. Sauca, M. Serra-Prat, M. Solsona, J. Almirall, et al.Crit Care Med 2008;36: 2558–2561

Contamination of the Clave® connector: effective decontamination using 70% isopropyl alcohol (88 KB)

Paul A. Gibilisco, Jeffrey S. Miller, Debra L. Holt

Facing the challenge of CRBSIs (73 KB)

Stoker R, Managing Infection Control, November 2009

Maintained low rate of catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) after discontinuation of a luer access device (LAD) at an academic medical center (72 KB)

C. Moore, R. Landreth, C. Maschmeier, K. Snyder, G. Priestly, et al. From a poster presented at the 2010 APIC annual meeting

The connector or not the connector: reduction of blood culture contamination (67 KB)

Landreth R, Moore C, Maschmeier C, Based on a poster presented at APIC Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, July 11–15, 2010

Minimizing Hemolysis During Blood Draws With The Neutron® Needlefree Catheter Patency Device (185 KB)

Minimizing Hemolysis During Blood Infusion with the Neutron® Needlefree Catheter Patency Device (136 KB)